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The Beginner's Guide to Mastering the Push-Up

Matt Skeffington

Matt’s primary role at Dynamic Strength and Conditioning is to make sure that our coaches and clients are consistently improving, all while operatin...

Matt’s primary role at Dynamic Strength and Conditioning is to make sure that our coaches and clients are consistently improving, all while operatin...

Jul 14 3 minutes read

So, you're ready to get started and into a consistent workout routine?

Let's rock and roll!

To get you started, we are going to be using the next few weeks to take you step-by-step through some of the most important and foundational exercises for you to focus on.

Today we're going all in on the push-up. 

When it comes to building a better, leaner, and stronger upper-body, there are few exercises that beat the push-up. 

No matter what your fitness goals are -- weight-loss, strength, endurance, to look and feel better, or a combination of these, the push-up should be a big part of your routine. 

They are a fantastic way to:

  • Improve the strength and tone of your triceps, chest and shoulders

  • Increase core stability

  • Improve shoulder health and function

  • Shred fat

Push-ups are a great foundation for many other exercises.

Being able to complete multiple, perfect push-ups is not only going to help you improve the fitness qualities mentioned above, but because they involve your entire body and require a lot of strength, they are also going to allow you to improve your strength and efficiency with a variety of other exercises like planks, rows, presses, burpees, and more!

Simply put, the better you get at push-ups, the better you will get at a variety of other exercises and the more advanced your fitness level will become. 

Think of the push-up as one of the key foundational movements when it comes to your fitness.

Here's the thing though...

In order to reap all the great benefits of push-ups, your technique, posture and position must be spot on. For many of us, this means slowing our push-ups down and taking a step back to take multiple steps forward. 

This will not only allow you to display better strength and stamina during your push-ups (leading to better results), but it will also decrease your risk of injury (especially around your wrists, elbows and shoulders).

Welcome to The Beginner's Guide of Mastering the Push-Up


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